28 2 / 2013

A Million Times- 288 analogue clock installation 

“Locked in its functionality to show the time, the natural character inherent to an analogue clock – with its two arms constantly dancing in slow motion around the center – unveils hidden figurative qualities without denying its primary purpose.”

(Source: itsnicethat.com)

18 1 / 2013

16 11 / 2012

zitterberg:

Huge numbers of seated figures were made out of ice by Brazilian artist Néle Azevedo. Installations involving the ice figures last until the final miniature has melted.

13 11 / 2012

massmoca:

Happy Diwali! The Indian holiday Diwali, or Deepavali, is also known as the Festival of Lights. The celebration gets its name from the rows of clay lamps lit outside Indian homes to symbolize inner light conquering spiritual darkness. These beautiful photos of Diwali night remind us of Spencer Finch’s 2008 installation “Night Sky.”

massmoca:

Happy Diwali! The Indian holiday Diwali, or Deepavali, is also known as the Festival of Lights. The celebration gets its name from the rows of clay lamps lit outside Indian homes to symbolize inner light conquering spiritual darkness. These beautiful photos of Diwali night remind us of Spencer Finch’s 2008 installation “Night Sky.”

11 11 / 2012

jessicastock:

Two installations entitled “Twisted Tales” and “The Basement Stacks” created by Wary Meyers for the VIA advertising agency who occupies the old Baxter building which served as Portland’s public library from 1888 until the 1960’s.

(via bookron)

09 11 / 2012

mydarkenedeyes:

William Forsythe - Scattered Crowd (2002)

07 11 / 2012

prostheticknowledge:

Windswept by Charles Sowers 

Art installation fixed outside a gallery’s wall, displaying natural flow and turbulence of the wind - via dezeen:

Hundreds of spinning blades reveal the invisible patterns of the wind in American artist Charles Sowers’ kinetic installation on the facade of the Randall Museum in San Francisco.

The installation, titled Windswept, consists of 612 rotating aluminium weather vanes mounted on an outside wall. As gusts of wind hit the wall, the aluminium blades spin not as one but independently, indicating the localised flow of the wind and the way it interacts with the building.

“Our ordinary experience of wind is as a solitary sample point of a very large invisible phenomenon,” said Sowers. “Windswept is a kind of large sensor array that samples the wind at its point of interaction with the Randall Museum building and reveals the complexity and structure of that interaction.”

You can find out more at Dezeen here, with photos and a video of the work in action.

29 10 / 2012

rcruzniemiec:

Be Like Water Aurora Robson

Comprised of approx 80,000 plastic bottle caps and 9000 discarded plastic bottles. 7 schools in the City of Philadelphia assisted in collecting plastic debris to use in the creation of this installation which was funded in part by the City of Philadelphia, Skybox, Eileen Tognini and other private donors.

(via uruouru)

14 10 / 2012

clareleetaylor:

It’s quite hard for me to find one defining image that sums up the effortless elegance, the grace, the puresadnessof Flex Gonzalez-Torres’ work. Gonzalez-Torres has been hailed and celebrated, Nicolas Bourriaud even devoting the majority of a chapter inRelational Aestheticsto him. It’s easy to understand why: his work opens a door for people, it blurs the boundary between art and appreciator.
Gonzalez-Torres’ work often referenced his own life. The above work, Portrait of Ross in LA, is a perfect example. When Gonzalez-Torres’ partner, Ross Laycock, was diagnosed with AIDS, the doctors told him his ideal body weight was 175 pounds - a figure which corresponded perfectly to the weight of candy put into the gallery. The artist invited the audience to take a piece, performing a dual function. The audience unwittingly played into the destruction of the art - forcing them to consider their role in the creation of the piece versus the responsibility of ensuring the work is not completely consumed - but they also helped to create a poignant, striking metaphor for the weight loss that accompanied Ross’ deteriorating health.
His work also referenced the less painful side of love. His imagery was full of two perfectly identical objects - two clocks, stopped at the same time, two pillows rumpled in the same fashion. These fly in the face of the traditional heterogeneous nature of romantic art, which generally portrays two opposite elements, two genders. His work celebrated being thesame, not forcing two similar things to adopt distinct, closed roles. Gonzales-Torres was unafraid to throw open the door to his life and show the deeply personal, in a fashion which allowed those from all walks of life to relate to it.
Click through on the image for a link to Gonzalez-Torres’ page on the Queer Cultural Centre website.

clareleetaylor:

It’s quite hard for me to find one defining image that sums up the effortless elegance, the grace, the puresadnessof Flex Gonzalez-Torres’ work. Gonzalez-Torres has been hailed and celebrated, Nicolas Bourriaud even devoting the majority of a chapter inRelational Aestheticsto him. It’s easy to understand why: his work opens a door for people, it blurs the boundary between art and appreciator.

Gonzalez-Torres’ work often referenced his own life. The above work, Portrait of Ross in LA, is a perfect example. When Gonzalez-Torres’ partner, Ross Laycock, was diagnosed with AIDS, the doctors told him his ideal body weight was 175 pounds - a figure which corresponded perfectly to the weight of candy put into the gallery. The artist invited the audience to take a piece, performing a dual function. The audience unwittingly played into the destruction of the art - forcing them to consider their role in the creation of the piece versus the responsibility of ensuring the work is not completely consumed - but they also helped to create a poignant, striking metaphor for the weight loss that accompanied Ross’ deteriorating health.

His work also referenced the less painful side of love. His imagery was full of two perfectly identical objects - two clocks, stopped at the same time, two pillows rumpled in the same fashion. These fly in the face of the traditional heterogeneous nature of romantic art, which generally portrays two opposite elements, two genders. His work celebrated being thesame, not forcing two similar things to adopt distinct, closed roles. Gonzales-Torres was unafraid to throw open the door to his life and show the deeply personal, in a fashion which allowed those from all walks of life to relate to it.

Click through on the image for a link to Gonzalez-Torres’ page on the Queer Cultural Centre website.

10 10 / 2012

minusmanhattan:

The Rain Room by Random International. Currently isntalled at The Barbican.
Photo by Oli Scarff.

minusmanhattan:

The Rain Room by Random International. Currently isntalled at The Barbican.

Photo by Oli Scarff.

(via dan7zim)